2013 in Review

Posted: January 1, 2014 by Travis Normand in Other
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The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 4,300 times in 2013. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 4 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

by Jessica Poarch Hernandez

On 16 August, Foreign Affairs posted an article by Martin Libicki entitled “Don’t Buy the Cyberhype: How to Prevent Cyberwars From Becoming Real Ones” which I think is an interesting counterpoint to some of the other articles considered on this blog. Essentially, the article argues that instead of spending time worrying about how to respond to Cyberattacks, we should spend time discouraging and finding ways to prevent them. The author points out that, “Although the risk of a debilitating cyberattack is real, the perception of that risk is far greater than it actually is. No person has ever died from a cyberattack, and only one alleged cyberattack has ever crippled a piece of critical infrastructure, causing a series of local power outages in Brazil. In fact, a major cyberattack of the kind intelligence officials fear has not taken place in the 21 years since the Internet became accessible to the public.” He then argues that the responding to cyberattacks, especially with conventional warfare, risks escalating the conflict to the point of a war which nobody wanted. He concludes that, “The United States can best mitigate the risks of cyberwar by adopting technical and political measures to discourage cyberattacks before they happen.”

The author’s  conclusion, in my mind, is logical and, should we take his approach,I believe it would be a good use of our time and resources but I question the wisdom of discounting the “cyberhype” altogether. Now is the time to prepare and determine the rules for responding to major cyberattacks, both by cyber-means and kinetic means. If the unlikely happens we should have a response on hand that has been reasoned out before hand and prevents an unnecessary waste of time or resources. 

by Travis Normand

Bradley Manning guilty of espionage charges but acquitted of ‘aiding enemy’

See The Guardian’s (theguardian.com) live blog here.

by Travis Normand

United States v. Jeffrey Sterling, . . . (4th Cir. 2013).

In its prosecution of Jeffrey Sterling, a former CIA employee accused of divulging classified information about the agency’s efforts to disrupt the Iranian nuclear program, the government subpoenaed James Risen.  Risen, a reporter for the New York Times, published stories that were apparently based on information fed to him by Mr. Sterling.  Risen essentially argued that he could refuse to testify and that he was protected by some form of reporter’s privilege.  However, in a 2-to-1 opinion released July 19, 2013, the  U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit held that Risen could not refuse to testify and that there is no First Amendment or federal common-law privilege protection available to him as a reporter.

The dissent listed many state law testimonial privileges that apply to reporters.

See the entire opinion HERE.

by Jessica Poarch Hernandez 

Debate over the future of the AUMF is surfacing in both public and private arenas. Recently, NPR and The Wilson Center hosted a panel discussion entitled “AUMF: Reasserting the Role of Congress” which featured Senator Bob Corker, Sarah Chayes, and Neal Katyal. The discussion, as the name implies, focused not on the constitutionality of the AUMF but on the balance of power associated with it. In fact, in her opening remarks, Jane Harman, the CEO of The Wilson Center, reminded the crowd that war powers are divided. Questions such as, “Is the AUMF necessary for the President to act,” “Is the AUMF too broad,” and “If the AUMF needs to be revised what needs to be replaced” were taken up.

There was not much of a debate, however. Ms. Chayes described it best when she told the audience that they had come for a heated panel and instead got a chorus. All of the panelist seemed to agree that the war powers, post-AUMF, are not being appropriately balanced between the Executive and Legislative branches and together called for Congress to take more “ownership” of the conflicts we are in. Where there was some disagreement was in the question of whether or not to revise or just completely repeal the AUMF. One suggestion that I found interesting was Senator Corker’s suggestion that the next AUMF be structured on a tier system that would give the President authority to act alone in certain instances but require him to get Congressional approval in others. This seems to directly track Jackson’s conception of Presidential Power in Youngstown which assessed the President’s power based on the actions of Congress. This was not the only solution offered by the panel. In any event, regardless of the chosen solution, the panel’s conclusion remains paramount – Congress must act.

Overall I found this discussion to be a refreshing and practical discourse on a complicated issue.

Listen to the discussion here. 

[Pod-Cast] The Torch: Cybersecurity

Posted: July 13, 2013 by Jessica Poarch in Cybersecurity
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by Jessica Poarch Hernandez

The Great Courses recently published a pod-cast which begins with a discussion of Cybersecurity calling it “the hidden war that threatens almost every household”. The discussion is wide-ranging and spans from defining ‘cyber’ to addressing why the internet is so vulnerable to hackers.

The pod-cast concludes by asking what the speaker calls the biggest policy question: How is the international community going to regulate the internet.

Listen here.

Movie: Dirty Wars

Posted: July 9, 2013 by Travis Normand in Conference and Events, Other
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by Travis Normand

Official website: DirtyWars.org

by Travis Normand

Video from the June 25, 2013 program on “NSA Surveillance Leaks: Facts and Fiction” is now available online.

You can view it here: www.ambar.org/natsecurity

The program was cosponsored by the ABA Standing Committee on Law and National Security, the Newseum and the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern.

by Jessica Poarch Hernandez

The OUPBlog recently posted a piece by Sascha-Dominik Bachmann entitled Drone Killings.   Adapted from an article published in the Journal of Conflict and Security Law, this post argues that  the use of drone technology “has direct implications for the morality of armed conflict and combat” because it puts too much distance between the shooter and the target. He then goes on to argue that the U.S. Government should reevaluate its use of Drone Technology and concern itself more with the broad issue of collateral damage.

Read the post here.

Google’s FISA Court Motion

Posted: June 19, 2013 by Travis Normand in National Security
Tags: ,

by Travis Normand

Below is a copy of the motion that Google filed on Tuesday with the FISA court.  The motion requests permission to publish data relating to the national security requests that Google has received.

[H/T: NYTimes.com]

Also, for a downloadable PDF copy of Google’s motion, see Wired.com HERE.